Wireless

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Harry Stevens was the main driving force behind the decision to enter the wireless market in 1923. He had been a keen amateur since before World War I and in 1922, following the launch of Britain's first radio stations and the formation of the BBC he convinced the rest of the AJS board to enter the market.

The first radios made by "AJS Wireless and Scientific Instruments" at their Lower Walsall Street factory were launched in 1923. Harry was keen that the company concentrate on producing models aimed at the top end of the market and set about designing a high quality range of 2, 3 and 4 valve receivers all well engineered in a choice of mahogony or oak cabinets.

The price of a standard wireless ranged from £17. 10s.0d for a 2 valve set to £52. 10s for a 4 valve pedestal model.

In order to promote the business AJS decided to exhibit at the 1924 Wireless Exhibition staged at the Royal Albert Hall. The products were received well and a number of important agents were appointed. AJS Wireless designs were soon established among the market leaders, although the AJS quality did not come cheap.

Prices became more relistic following the abolition of various royalties, testing and registration rules, brought about by the increase in foriegn competition and following a dramatic increase in demand further manufacturing capacity was made available at the Stewart Street Factory.

In 1926, a change in the industry saw a move towards more simple designs and fully enclosed workings. AJS, having seen sales of their traditional models fall, adapted and introduced a new range at the first "National Radio Exhibition" at Olympia. Initially sales were good, but by the end of 1926 AJS were forced to adopt mass production techniques to remain competitive. A further setback occured with the move towards "all main" sets in the home and AJS moved to design a "portable" radio that could be used in homes without electricity and carried outside.

Although AJS went to great lengths to remain competitive, the market was unstable and in 1928, the company decided to give up radio manufacture and sold the factory and remaining components to the "Symphony Gramophone and Radio Company".

Click on the link below to read more about AJS's venture into wireless and radios

https://www.historywebsite.co.uk/Museum/Engineering/Electronics/ajs.htm